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by Thornton Staples, Director of Community Outreach and Alliances, DuraSpace Now that DSpace and Fedora have combined forces, we are beginning to bring together our community outreach activities to take advantage of both of our efforts. Chris Wilper and Brad McClean are working together on the developer community side of things, and Valerie Hollister and I are working on the user community.

Submitted by Anonymous on 2009-07-24 16:33

By Chris Wilper, Technical Lead and Developer, DuraSpace Fedora Commons hosted a very successful Developer Open House at OR09 earlier this summer. Thanks to all who attended and participated. Through this formal session and in on-the-fly hallway discussions we got some great ideas on how to improve developer participation. As the developer-community around Fedora and DuraSpace continues to grow and evolve, it makes even more sense to create communications channels that enable broad involvement.

Submitted by Anonymous on 2009-07-24 16:12

A recent study by Anne Gentil-Beccot, Salvatore Mele, and Travis Brooks, “Citing and Reading Behaviours in High-Energy Physics: How a Community Stopped Worrying about Journals and Learned to Love Repositories” argues that physicists are well-served by depositing their papers in ArXiv early and often. ArXiv is owned, operated and funded by Cornell University. This analysis of key points made by Gentil-Beccot et al is from Stevan Harnad, University of Southampton:
“This is an important study, and most of its conclusions are valid:

Submitted by Anonymous on 2009-07-21 10:55

College Station, Texas Repositories are being deployed in a variety of environments (education, research, science, cultural heritage) and contexts (national, regional, institutional, project, lab, personal).  Regardless of setting, context or scale, repositories are increasingly expected to operate across administrative and disciplinary boundaries and to interact with distributed computational services and social communities.  The many repository platforms available today are changing the nature of scholarly communication.

Submitted by Anonymous on 2009-07-20 15:32