Meet the Members – Episode 2

Welcome to the second episode in a series of blog posts aimed at introducing you to some of the wonderful members within our community who work tirelessly to advocate, educate and promote Fedora and other community-supported programs like ours. At Fedora, we are strong because of our people and without individuals like this advocating for continued development we would not be where we are today. 

Fedora is an open-source, community-supported program funded entirely by membership contributions. Without our members, we would not be able to support the preservation of the vital content contained within the repositories of our users around the world. Find out how you can help. Learn more and become a member today!

This week we would like to introduce you to Rosalyn Metz and Robin Ruggaber, two former chairs of our Steering and Leadership Governance groups.

Let’s Meet Rosalyn!

Rosalyn Metz, Associate Dean, Library Technology & Digital Strategies, Emory University Libraries

Tell me your name, where you work and what your title is.

“I’m Rosalyn Metz – Associate Dean, Library Technology & Digital Strategies at Emory University Libraries.”

How are you involved with Fedora Governance?

I’m less involved than I was previously as the chair-elect and the chair. Right now I’m a member of Fedora Steering and I participate on the Fedora Governance and Business Model Vision and Strategy Group.

How long have you been involved with Fedora? How long have you been involved in Fedora Governance?

My first interaction with Fedora was in 2009 or 2010 when I was working at Wheaton College in Norton, MA. A colleague in the archives was interested in preserving the college’s records and we thought Fedora might be a good solution to the problem. I installed it and played around a little, but ultimately the colleague chose to focus on paper records first and we put the idea on the back burner. Fast forward 4 years and while working at Stanford I attended my first Fedora meeting at PASIG in Karlsruhe, Germany and I’ve participated in the community as time has allowed ever since.”

 What compels you to continue to advocate for Fedora? Why do you think it’s important

“I believe digital preservation is a series of activities organizations undertake to ensure content remains safe for now and into the future. At the same time I believe preserving content in software that will outlive any single company or organization helps to ensure our content can do the same. Fedora helps organizations serve both of those functions and is a natural complement to any digital preservation plan.

What is the coolest thing you’ve done with your repository?

Emory University Libraries exposed much of the information contained within Fedora in our Hyrax-based repository marrying digital preservation with our access repository.

If you could be any animal, what would it be and why?

My cat. She’s a prolific hunter catching and bringing home all manner of creatures as gifts, sometimes multiple gifts a day! At the same time she manages to spend most of her day lounging about on soft cushy blankets. Oh to be so productive with so little effort.

And now, without further adieu…Robin!

Robin Ruggaber, Director of Strategic Technology Partnerships & Initiatives, University of Virginia

Tell me your name, where you work and what your title is.

“I’m Robin Ruggaber – Director of Strategic Technology Partnerships & Initiatives at the University of Virginia Libraries.”

How are you involved with Fedora Governance?

“I am currently a member of Fedora Steering & Fedora Leaders, serving on the Communication, Outreach, Marketing, and Community Strategy Group. I am also working on the IMLS funded project Fedora Migration Paths & Tools with UVA serving as a pilot project partner.

How long have you been involved with Fedora? How long have you been involved in Fedora Governance?

“The UVA Library was one of the original implementation partners back in 2001. I got involved in the Fedora Futures project in 2012 and have since worked in Steering, Leaders and various strategy groups.

What compels you to continue to advocate for Fedora? Why do you think it’s important?

“I am fully committed to preserving cultural heritage and making knowledge openly accessible. Fedora offers a preservation-focused repository that is based on standards and is flexible enough to stand alone or support an array of digital management technologies (Samvera, Islandora, etc). I see Fedora as a strong foundational element to any digital library system architecture.

If you could be any animal, what would it be and why?

The tawny Jaguar which chose me so it simply is. Thanks!

Thank you again to Rosalyn and Robin for taking the time let us learn a little bit more about their stories and why they choose to continue to contribute to the Fedora community. If you would like more information about Fedora Governance you can find more information on our wiki here.

And for additional information on how you can support community-supported programs like Fedora, please consider becoming a Member by clicking here.