VIVO Updates for April 14, 2019 — A DOI for VIVO software, VIVO Combine, RDA, CNI and Summit, ROR

VIVO 1.10.0 has a DOI  VIVO has a DOI! It is 10.5281/zenodo.2639713 This is a Zenodo archive DOI for release 1.10.0. This DOI is required to complete the Journal of Open Source Software paper which has submitted last fall. The paper’s favorable review has been completed and we expect publication shortly. You will also note that the VIVO repository README has been updated to include a Zenodo archive DOI badge. See https://github.com/vivo-project/VIVO A new wiki page has been created to document that the project now has a Zenodo community collection. The wiki page is here:  Zenodo Community Collection.  The Zenodo Community Collection is here:  https://zenodo.org/communities/vivo/ I’m currently the curator of the archive record at Zenodo. I’d love to have some community members join me as named archivists able to add things to the archive, mint new DOI as appropriate and execute the projects archive policy (to be written by project governance).

VIVO Combine Item 3 in the Product Direction for 2019 is “VIVO Combine” – a new piece of software for collecting metadata for scholarship, providing disambiguation of works and people, and curation by authors and curators.  We hope to form a Combine interest group soon and look forward to your ideas about it.  Several VIVO sites have sophisticated metadata collection and curation processes and are considering the approach to producing open source software for use in the scholarly ecosystem.  Look for an announcement soon.

RDA  I had a good visit to the 13th plenary Research Data Alliance meeting in Philadelphia.  FAIR data was all the rage, with many interest and working groups considering how best to make research data FAIR.  VIVO has a straightforward approach based on ontology, RDF, and TPF.  That is, VIVO can be deployed in a manner that provides FAIR data.  I am using this approach as part of an NIH grant to make metabolomic data more FAIR.  I am also contributing to a working group on representing specimens of various, which has recommended the VIVO ontology as an approach to FAIR specimen data.  I continue to work with the Data Foundations and Terminology group, as well as an emerging interest group on research graphs.  RDA participants understand that VIVO produces an institutional research graph based on its triple store and ontology.  The emergence of research graphs is a hot topic at RDA.  The next plenary will be held in October in Helsinki.  We hope to continue all these efforts there.

CNI and Summit  Last week I had a chance to see many members of the VIVO community at the Coalition for Networked Information meetings in St. Louis, followed by the Duraspace Summit.  The VIVO project had two breakouts – one focused on current technical initiatives, including the transition from the product evolution effort to the new VIVO Scholar Task Forceeffort, work beginning on a second version of the VIVO ontology (more about that here soon),  the VIVO Combine effort, and the recent work on VIVO 1.11, including additional decoupling and improvements in internationalization.  A second breakout considered the needs of the VIVO project in the context of the merger of Duraspace and LYRASIS.  Laurie Arp from LYRASIS participated in the breakout as an observer.  The VIVO Leadership Group is considering how best to create a strong future for the project.  Your thoughts about the merger and how VIVO might prosper in a new organization are very welcome.  Please share with any member of the leadership group, myself included.

ROR At both RDA and the CNI Meeting, presentations were made regarding ROR – the Research Organization Registry. See  http://ror.org ROR is an effort of the California Digital Library, CrossRef, Digital Science, and others to build on the work of the Digital Science GRID project.  GRID is a CC0 dataset of information regarding the research organizations of the world.  ROR uses the GRID data to provide identifiers, URI, a curation process and an open API for research organization data.  The goal is to create standard pick lists for publishers, repositories, and metadata integrates such as VIVO so that affiliation information is standardized across the ecosystem.  Expect to hear more about ROR – its policies, sustainability and its use in the VIVO ontology to provide common organizational assertions across VIVO implementations.

Reminders  See the VIVO Event Calendar for all VIVO meetings.  Register for the VIVO Conference.  Submit your work for presentation at the conference!

Go VIVO!

Mike

Mike Conlon
VIVO Project Director